Caribbean Travel News

The content originally appeared on: News Americas Now
The USVI is among the Caribbean destinations that have dropped COVID-19 entry protocols.

News Americas, NEW YORK, NY, Fri. June 24, 2022: Here are the top stories making Caribbean travel news in 60 seconds for this week ending June 24, 2022:

The Caribbean is Truly Open For Travel with Most destinations now dropping previously rigid travel COVID-19 protocols. The U.S. Virgin Islands, the Dominican Republic, Aruba and Jamaica have removed all COVID-19 restrictions as has Puerto Rico while most Caribbean countries including the Bahamas and Saint Lucia have eliminated COVID-19 testing requirements for fully vaccinated visitors.

Guyana has lifted COVID-19 testing requirement for international travel effective June 18 but travellers 12 years and older are still required to be FULLY vaccinated for entry.

IHG Hotels & Resorts, one of the world’s leading hotel companies, recently celebrated the groundbreaking of its new InterContinental Grenada Resort hotel. Located on the scenic shoreline of La Sagesse Beach the InterContinental Grenada Resort is projected to open in 2025.

Great news for the small Caribbean island of Sint Eustatius, which is now a CDC Level 1 or low risk country, down from level three or high risk.

American Airlines says it will be increasing its flights to Antigua & Barbuda, with daily service from New York to the VC Bird International Airport through the early fall and winter tourist seasons.

Get ready to fly by charter on QCAS Aero non-stop from Fort Lauderdale International Airport to the Ian Fleming International Airport in Ocho Rios, Jamaica. The new charter service is specifically targeting high-end travelers and provides ease of access throughout the island.

Starting July 1st, Bonaire will replace its current ‘room tax’ and rental ‘car tax’ with a combined $75 per visit Visitor Entry Tax, that can be paid digitally at bonaireisland.com in advance or upon arrival at Flamingo International Airport.

And Scientists have discovered the world’s largest bacterium in a Caribbean mangrove swamp in Guadeloupe.